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How Your Child Is Being Dumbed Down

There is a Trojan Horse within our midst and it is called Common Core. I did a cursory analysis of the program as the implementation came down which stated that implementation was imminent.

Finding information on this program has been difficult to say the least. The vast majority of teachers know next to nothing about the program. School administrators have many unanswered questions about Common Core’s implementation strategies, policies and regulations. This portion of the Common Core series focuses on the baseless and even false claims that Common Core will improve the majority of the students academic performance and ready them for college.

College Ready?

Isn’t it interesting that our government says that is their goal to get students ready for college while at the same time overseeing an increase in college tuition which is eight times greater than the inflation rate as well as running a corrupt student loan program which is making debt slaves out of college students.

I laugh at the Common Core advocates who say the program is designed to get students ready for college because there is not one legitimate shred of proof to back up the claim. In fact, all of the credible research maintains that educational achievement will go backwards under Common Core.

It is very disturbing that it remains unclear what governance structure will be created in the future to address issues related to the Common Core Standards. What is clear is that the Standards are owned and copyrighted by nongovernmental (NGO) entities unaccountable to parents and students in individual states.

The Impact of Common Core on Math

The educational mantra of the federal government is that they wish for our students to lead the world in math and science. My son is an excellent math student and this was impetus and motivation for me to investigate Common Core’s claims that math skills of students will be enhanced by following this novel program. Subsequently, I have examined and re-examined the impact of Common Core on math.

The standards require the teaching of geometry to follow an experimental method, which has never been used successfully anywhere in the world. And despite the claims made by Common Core advocates, the Common Core standards are not internationally bench-marked.

In fact, exclusion of key math concepts is commonplace under Common Core. The Pioneer Institutes examination of Common Core revealed the following deficiencies:

·         “Common Core fails to teach prime factorization and consequently does not include teaching about least common denominators or greatest common factors.

·         Common Core fails to include conversions among fractions, decimals, and percents, identified as a key skill by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

·         Common Core de-emphasizes algebraic manipulation, which is a prerequisite for advanced mathematics, and instead effectively redefines algebra as “functional algebra”, which does not prepare students for STEM careers.

·         Common Core does not require proficiency with addition and subtraction until grade 4, a grade behind the expectations of the high-performing states and our international competitors.

·         Common Core does not require proficiency with multiplication using the standard algorithm (step-by-step procedure for calculations) until grade 5, a grade behind the expectations of the high-performing states and our international competitors.

·         Common Core does not require proficiency with division using the standard algorithm until grade 6, a grade behind the expectations of the high-performing states and our international competitors.

·         Common Core starts teaching decimals only in grade 4, about two years behind the more rigorous state standards, and fails to use money as a natural introduction to this concept.

·         Common Core fails to teach in K-8 about key geometrical concepts such as the area of a triangle, sum of angles in a triangle, isosceles and equilateral triangles, or constructions with a straightedge and compass that good state standards include.”

 Additionally I found more examples of Common Core taking student achievement backwards through delaying when children which type of math.

  • The mathematics standards place Algebra I in ninth grade, rather than in grade 8 where it has traditionally been taught. This fact guarantees that the majority of students will not reach calculus in high school.

  • The standards require the teaching of  geometry to follow an experimental method, which has never been used successfully anywhere in the world. And  despite the claims made by Common Core advocates, the Common Core standards are not internationally bench-marked.

  • Common Core excludes certain Algebra II and Geometry content that is currently a prerequisite at almost every four-year state college.

In fact, exclusion of key math concepts is commonplace under Common Core. The Pioneer Institutes examination of Common Core revealed the following deficiencies:

·         “Common Core fails to teach prime factorization and consequently does not include teaching about least common denominators or greatest common factors.

·         Common Core fails to include conversions among fractions, decimals, and percents, identified as a key skill by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

·         Common Core de-emphasizes algebraic manipulation, which is a prerequisite for advanced mathematics, and instead effectively redefines algebra as “functional algebra”, which does not prepare students for STEM careers.

·         Common Core does not require proficiency with addition and subtraction until grade 4, a grade behind the expectations of the high-performing states and our international competitors.

·         Common Core does not require proficiency with multiplication using the standard algorithm (step-by-step procedure for calculations) until grade 5, a grade behind the expectations of the high-performing states and our international competitors.

·         Common Core does not require proficiency with division using the standard algorithm until grade 6, a grade behind the expectations of the high-performing states and our international competitors.

·         Common Core starts teaching decimals only in grade 4, about two years behind the more rigorous state standards, and fails to use money as a natural introduction to this concept.

·         Common Core fails to teach in K-8 about key geometrical concepts such as the area of a triangle, sum of angles in a triangle, isosceles and equilateral triangles, or constructions with a straightedge and compass that good state standards include.”

The aforementioned facts speak for themselves and require no further elaboration.

Please tell me how our children are better off under these circumstances? They are not!  Recently, I unsuccessfully tried to enroll my son in one of the Basis charter schools. I asked some very pointed questions about Common Core and how it was impacting their instructional strategies and course offerings. After the administrators wiped away their smiles, I was told that Common Core is something that they do not worry about because their curriculum and student expectations are so much higher that Common Core is not a factor in the education of their students. Unfortunately, my son was “wait-listed” and he did not get in because of over-crowding. Fortunately, we feel that our second choice, a specialized public school is promising and we have high hopes.

Class Warfare

Also at issue here is the perpetuation of class warfare. If my kid gets a quality education and your kid doesn’t, then your kid is going to work for my kid and on my kid’s terms. If the elite’s kids are going to be attending schools like Basis, or some affluent school that a middle class family cannot afford or gain entry to, this perpetuates a bifurcation of future opportunities. And when programs like Common Core are imposed on the public schools, the class differences related to education are exacerbated. All education should be free to all, as education can be the great equalizer. However, that would not serve the need to dominate by the elite of this country and this is another discussion for another article.

The aforementioned facts beg the question, how many parents actually look into these factors such as Common Core? How many parents simply entrust their neighborhood schools to provide an education that will make the children university ready? Would you write a blank check to pay your electric bill or to purchase a new car? Of course you wouldn’t. Then why would you write a blank check to your neighborhood school when so much is at stake? 

Conclusion

There are still excellent teachers and outstanding principals who pay lip service to the “standards,” and go above and beyond to provide quality opportunities to enhance the education of their students. What kind of school does your child go to? It might behoove you to investigate your child’s school, just as if your child’s future may depend upon it, because it does.

In the next installment, I will be exposing how science is being dumbed down as well and identify who actually created Common Core. The answer will surprise many of you.

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By | 2017-10-26T22:14:43+00:00 August 2nd, 2013|Education, Featured, Main|25 Comments

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25 Comments

  1. joanie August 3, 2013 at 4:13 am

    Our children learn best at home, whether it be about farming, cooking, math or… Parents are the primary educators. Dave, be your son’s influence, rather than hope, expect etc, outside sources to do what you want your son to learn. What’s that saying, if you want something done right, do it yourself… the system is group think for “their” specific plans for upcoming humans and thus society is hurting for lack of education “required”. Be an individual and teach your son individuality, providing more knowledge than the system is demanding, the dumbingdown affect. Common Core reminds me of schools of fish mentality….

  2. laura m. August 3, 2013 at 9:11 am

    Any true informed patriot and/or Christian would never put their kids in gov.schools. Much has been written exposing common core. Pull them out folks and get them in a Christian school or home school . I have met patriots that appear to be informed that still sent their kids to gov run schools that are in denial on this one thing. I won’t get involved with patriots that have part of their brain stuck in stupid. Ditto for those involved in gov controlled IRS/501 churches and other 501c3 org. like the Heritage or Rutherford foundations that are run by neo cons, phony conservatives, and change agents.

  3. Christine Rosencrans August 3, 2013 at 9:44 am

    This message should be sent to EVERY school district in America!

  4. anon August 3, 2013 at 1:26 pm

    You obviously got a very poor education, lying and spreading disinformation — if core standards mean children are not going to be as stoooooopid as you, they are GOOD!

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Spell and grammar check is a wondrous invention. Having said that, I will let your comment stand on its own literary merit.

  5. jc August 3, 2013 at 2:34 pm

    as class of 1988, we were introduced to algebra in 6th grade 1981 or so and had full class in jr high on it in the 7th grade….If I remember correctly, not surprised they pushed it down the grade scale a bit. It was in the 6th grade that they came out with the “new math” that completely frustrated students and aggravated parents like my own father who had taught me over the summer how to do long division etc. Suddenly there were many more steps and it was an obtuse way of learning math. Even though the answers were correct, your problems were marked wrong because you did not follow the method. Turned a lot of kids off from school.

  6. Anthony Alfidi August 3, 2013 at 3:03 pm

    Online learning is rapidly making discussions about school curricula moot. Kids can learn as much as they want online at their own pace. Most occupations don’t require a college education anyway, so forcing students into a college track will do most of them a disservice.

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Your statement is not backed up by the facts. In general, college graduates make 2-4 times more, on average, than non grads.

  7. MC August 3, 2013 at 4:07 pm

    Hi there,

    I am an engineer and elementary school math teacher who is certified in K-6 common core mathematics. Most of what I read above is simply not true. The common core was developed to go deeper as opposed to our shallow, all-encompassing study of mathematics today. Personally, I would like to return to the math that I was taught. It has the redeeming feature of having placed a man on the moon. However, that being said, the common core is simply a coordinated starting point that promotes understanding at a fundamental level as opposed to rote drills. I see it as a starting point. I fully intend to make sure students leaving my classroom will know as much, IF NOT MORE, than my previous students. Good teachers will still teach, regardless of the “chosen” program. Check out your child’s teachers, more than the school or county’s programs. As in all things, it comes down to the dedicated people.

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Common Core has been independently analyzed. I presented a cross-section of the research. You are welcome to do the same. Your statements parrot the purveyors of this misguided approach. However, they have not produced on shred of evidence to back up their empty claims and you have made rookie mistake of drinking from their Koolaid troth. Most importantly, I think that for you to state that what is presented in the article is not so, without any disconfirming data, is academically disingenuous and as an educator, you should know better.

    I do agree it comes down to the teachers. Experienced teachers will overcome this backwards program. However, what about all the teachers who are just beginning or will be beginning their career? They will be propagandized into worshiping the latest fad, albeit a dangerous fad for the future of our kids.

  8. Menachem Korn August 3, 2013 at 4:55 pm

    I attended a conference on collaboration between Jewish and Baptist groups. They boasted of one of their great achievments working together to prohibit prayer in public schools:
    http://ethicsdaily.com/what-i-heard-at-baptist-jewish-dvd-screenings-in-greensboro-and-mobile-cms-13524?vm=r

    After the talk I asked the following question:

    I find it incredible that Baptists and Jews, who have their own private and very expensive religious schools, would cooperate to work to eviscerate from public schools in America all knowledge of God!

    Is God only for the rich? I think this plays into your point above about school standards. Clearly children who have a religious belief are often more strongly motivated to succeed and much more self assured as they feel the Universe is working for them.

    This seems like more of an effort to ensure a dumbed down apathetic and servile mass of impoverished citizenry.

  9. Arizona August 3, 2013 at 5:02 pm

    A country who has abandoned the LORD is ending ,LIKE IT OR NOT,the russians are here and it ain’t to teach your children to be good students in school,the lord says their going in to captivity,and be taken away to be slaves in foreign countries,AND IF THE LORD SAYS IT,thats it,game over for the worst TERRORIST NATION IN HISTORY,murdering children don’t lead to nothing but death and the anti-christ is here and the death of america is on the horizon,BETTER TEACH YOUR CHILDREN “FARMING “it might be what keeps them from starving to death if you really care what happens to them………..

  10. CanadaBoy1991 August 3, 2013 at 5:09 pm

    We’ve home schooled all our kids from day one until one decided that she wanted to go to a Bricks and Mortar school for her final year of High School. In that year I discovered what has happened to the school system (at least in Canada) By grade 12 they’ve managed to suppress their natural curiosity so that kids no longer ask the question why. They can mostly tell you the how and where. The when is a bit of a problem too. But there are very few kids who ask why anymore. And the response is varied. Some teachers love it, others view it as a distraction from covering the “real” material.

    I don’t think the rest of our children will even spend one year in the school system.

  11. avi August 3, 2013 at 6:15 pm

    to joanie …
    yes but there is nothing wrong in learning maths, physics, medecine at a high level and unless you’re at the same time a PhD in every matter, your child will still work as Dave says for someone else’s child. I believe the problem, while being exactly as exposed in that great article lies also in the value society gives to all kinds of jobs. It is no more valuable to be a great scientist than a good farmer because the first needs the second. Society should provide the same reward to every kind of jod together with the ability for every kid to get a first class education. The children who succeed in maths should be able to hope for making a living out of their skills no less than those who are good at wood working in becoming carpenters, for instance. The problem is that society creates jobs that fit its nature and in our hightech world, you cannot make a living without being good at computers and work for the global masters just as 500 years ago you had to be a soldier for the kings’ wars. It is the meaning of the society that ought to be changed in order to get jobs that do not fit in the masters’ plan. If scientific jobs where turned for humanity’s goodness and not for profit, I bet people would be happier with much lower salaries, even more so when those salaries would be equal to those of farmers and carpenters and children would again be happy children with no ADHD, autism or anything like that.

  12. kathy August 3, 2013 at 7:22 pm

    I LIVE IN SOUTHEAST TEXAS, CSCOPE IS BEING REMOVED OUR SCHOOLS HERE AS OF THIS MONTH, OR AT LEAST THAT IS WHAT WE ARE BEING TOLD. I HAVE A COUPLE OF QUESTIONS: 1. IS CSCOPE AND COMMON CORE SIMILAR? AND SECOND HOW DO YOU INVESTIGATE A PUBLIC SCHOOL AND HOW AND WHAT THEY TEACH?

    EDITOR’S NOTE: I don’t know about CSCOPE- Guarantee you that Common Core is in your district. Take my claims on math that I cited in the article to your school board. I am also publishing something similar on science. Show your board the evidence and demand action. If you don’t like the answers you get, get a small consortium of parents and home school. Good luck

  13. AJ August 3, 2013 at 9:03 pm

    Mathtutordvd.com… I use it and it is very, very helpful. I highly recommend looking into it! Videos may be watched online or purchased for home use. Also check out Mathtv.com. :-))

    Be your own educator. We now live in a wide world of excellent self serve education resources! ENJOY LEARNING!

    PS. Videos may easily be reviewed several times on certain “tricky” or hard to understand concepts. This way the learner can more easily get a bit more clear with the various math concepts than one can usually get in a live classroom setting.

  14. Henry August 3, 2013 at 11:22 pm

    The old books are the best as they teach long lost skills, including how to think, rather than how to memorize and regurgitate. The ranking of US students has slipped as measured against other countries. The successful education methods of other countries have been studied in detail, but the methods are never adopted in the US. We have lost the art of analyzing problems and also critical thinking.

    Corporations and government (essentially the same thing) don’t want thinkers, they want obedient robots. So let’s pump the kids full of Ritalin and a cocktail of other drugs to get them accustomed to doing business with big pharma and to living in a drug induced stupor.

    There are some very enlightening videos about the subject of education on YouTube by Ken Robinson, Noam Chomsky, and Sugata Mitra (hole in the wall computers). All are worth watching.

  15. Anthony Clifton August 4, 2013 at 12:24 am

    goats have kids.

    http://www.israelect.com/reference/Willie-Martin/

    humans live in “Jew” worshipping “Societies” of the masses.

    http://biblehub.com/zephaniah/3-9.htm

    Jews & Baptists serve and worship the same deity of the stool sculpture deity cult . . .

    http://biblehub.com/text/isaiah/3-12.htm

    there were never any so-called “Jews” in the Old Testament…

    http://buelahman.wordpress.com/2013/08/03/childrens-fantasy-writers/

    stupid will never change true

  16. scott August 4, 2013 at 3:25 am

    Henry Ford once told Woodrow Wilson,”If the people are allowed to get educated and become smart,who will work in the factories?”After that my friends,the dept of education was created.Before the dept of education,schools were handled locally and funded by local money,I believe it was Marx that wrote,if one wants to turn his country socialist,he needs to do the following things can be learned here,these are the writings of Karl Marx from 1848,his work is still studied today.

    http://laissez-fairerepublic.com/tenplanks.html

    EDITOR’S NOTE: The early industrialists, who gave birth to the notion of American public education said something fairly similar. They wanted people smart enough to do their job, but to ignorant to question authority.

  17. abinico warez August 4, 2013 at 11:43 am

    Kids need to eat more hydrogenated fats and drink more beverages with HFCS – then it will all be OK. Ohh… and they need to get their vaccinations ASAP.

  18. Anonymous August 4, 2013 at 12:42 pm

    Time for people to wake up and smell the dung. This is just another way to divide the social classes. Does anyone actually believe that the 1% wants children of the lower class competing with their kids for “their” jobs? Pick up a broom & sweep the sidewalk already. There’s already enough 1%-er kids competing for those jobs. They don’t need the feral & uncivilized sneaking in on their turf. Besides, having an over-abundance of candidates for a particular “highly-skilled” profession will just lower wages for that profession. By keeping lower-class kids from obtaining education, the scope of candidates for “highly-skilled” professions narrows and thus maintains a decent salary range for 1%er kids. Know your place people!!!

  19. Mark August 5, 2013 at 9:48 am

    I would agree that the Common Core is designed to make average teachers out of everyone. No longer will the extraordinary teacher be held in esteem but will have to be held to the common standard. As the nation continues to move to a business model of telling teacher/principals that they are good or not, based on data results. I question, the fact, is that data going to be reliable or relevant in the process. Each year teacher takes on new students with new needs and motivators. It takes time to find where students are at and their ability levels. It is not like making a car where the parts are all the same for each similar car. The human factor is much more complicated and difficult to control.
    I believe that big business sees that around $600 billion is spent on Education and that they want a piece of the pie. How do they accomplish this goal by discrediting a system that educates everyone and not just a few? By preaching that we are falling behind the rest of the world and that public schools are a terrible environment and that the only solution are charter or private schools where only good (wealthy) students get a great education. Trends in state legislatures across the country are facing the onslaught of legislation to divert public monies to private schools. I recently attended a workshop that said when you see a group advocating for change to public education follow which foundations are contributing to run these ads in the news, in newspaper and on web. You will more than likely find a small group of WEALTHY people behind the funding.
    Schools are slowly losing local control over who educates, how our students are educated, and to what degree our students are educated. Legislation will make that decision for use soon enough.

  20. Mike Baron August 5, 2013 at 6:14 pm

    Dave, I love your site and your commentary, and thanks for your investigation and conclusions about “Common Core”, but why in the world would you send your kids to any of these government re-education centers??? Regardless how advanced their Math and Science programs are. That’s the real question I would liked answered in your next installment. Sincerely, Mike Baron

    EDITOR’S NOTE: This is a fair question. All schools are tying into Common Core. Some schools are priding themselves on going beyond the CC. The only other option is homeschooling, which we already do a fair share of. We are close to the home school option. We are migrating to this particular school with other Christians and we have rented a classroom at the school to conduct Bible studies before school. We are vigilant and will make adjustments if need be.

  21. Michael Baron August 5, 2013 at 7:53 pm

    Hi Dave, thanks for your quick response. I want to apologize. I hope I did not sound too judgemental and maybe where you are located there are not many Christian schools available, but besides the dumbing-down of the curriculum in the Public Schools there’s also moral dumbing-down going on at the re-education centers . There is a total lack of any moral guidance or acknowledgement of God. Trust me my wife and I struggle financially and we do a lot without, but the public schools are not an alternative these days. Maybe the public schools were ok when you and I were growing up, I can still remember Christmas plays and decorations in my schools, but not today. My wife and I are still amazed that practically all the kids in our Church go to public school (except for the few that are home-schooled), and we probably make less money than most of them. Don’t people realize the sort of effect that indoctrination can have on a Child?

    Sincerely,

    Mike Baron
    PS You were great on Hagmann & Hagmann.

  22. Jen Z August 7, 2013 at 11:12 am

    Don’t get too excited about the Christian schools… the one that I just pulled my kids out of have been rolling out Common Core. Don’t assume that private and religious schools aren’t using it.

  23. Bonifide August 8, 2013 at 1:18 am

    Time to start home schooling again. If you can’t see what they are teaching your children at school. If they are teaching things like sexual orientation crap, Islam as an alternative, or unfavorable history of America, etc., and disregarding the finer points of the 3 R’s, GET YOUR KIDS OUT OF THERE and start searching home schooling sites and get together with others of the same mind.

  24. B.J. August 8, 2013 at 7:58 am

    Thank you for the excellent article. You did a great job of explaining a difficult subject.

    However, I question this statement: “There are still excellent teachers and outstanding principals who pay lip service to the “standards,” and go above and beyond to provide quality opportunities to enhance the education of their students.,”

    It is my understanding any school that accepts Common Core must implement 85% word for word and are only allowed 15% for deviations. Also, because SAT tests will be tied into the Common Core curriculum, all schools, Christian and private – plus home schooled, will be forced into to use due to SAT scores and college admissions.

    How can a school or teacher get away from those facts? I submit it is far better to do all we can to stop Obamacare before it becomes entrenched in all our schools. It is not just about OUR specific children but the nation as a whole.

    Like Obamacare, Common Core is a nationalized system, one that has incorporated major changes, is highly controversial, and most importantly has not been thoroughly tried and tested to see if it is indeed superior, per its authors’ claims.

    Great damage can result if it does not live up to its authors’ promises. We should be concerned knowing some members of the C.C. accreditation committee would not give their acceptance of it and two have become activists against it. Not a promising sign of success.

    Get the facts and talk to YOUR School Board Trustees and elected state officials. Many of them are not aware of all the facts.

  25. David L August 17, 2013 at 5:50 pm

    Here’s my take: over the last decade, kids have been “dumbing down” themselves by expending all of their energy on their laptops and cell phones with videogames, Facebook, Instagram, etc. At the same time, teachers are having to deal with increased class loads and kids with no motivation to learn. Many teachers are more interested about working less and getting better union benefits than helping our children. The less vigorous core curriculum is easier on the students and therefore easier on the teachers.

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