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In China, ‘Social Credit’ System Forces Citizens Into Submission To The State

In China, ‘Social Credit’ System Forces Citizens Into Submission To The State

When your personal data turns bad, whether real or imagined, China will basically ex-communicate you from the good life, and they have already done this to tens of millions of detractors. This is as effective as Tiananmen Square slaughter, but was implemented slowly so people never had a clue what was happening to them. Now, they are trapped, shunned, penalized and in some cases, destitute.  ⁃ TN Editor

The terrifying initiative, which has been rolled out through pilot scheme, bans low-rated people from buying plane tickets and sending their kids to private s

China’s  ‘social credit’ system blacklists “lazy” citizens who get into debt or spend their time playing video games in a creepy initiative that could have come straight out of Black Mirror.

Analysing users’ social media habits and online shopping purchases, the nightmarish system also grants real financial credit to citizens whose lifestyles are deemed to be more wholesome.

While the social credit scheme will become mandatory in China in 2020, it is currently being tested in pilot schemes which have been rolled out through private financial companies.

The most high profile of these is Sesame Credit which has been developed by Ant Financial and uses computer algorithms to score people from 350 to 950, reports The Guardian.

Likened to an episode of dystopian horror series Black Mirror, Sesame Credit rates people on factors including “interpersonal relationships” and consumer habits including buying video games.

It appears the authoritarian one-party state believes that someone who plays a PlayStation or an Xbox is an “idle person”, reports the BBC.

Those with a low-rating are “blacklisted” meaning they are unable to book a plane flight, prevented from renting or buying property and are unable to secure a loan or stay in a luxury hotel, reports MarketPlace.org.

One of the largest schemes currently operating is in Shanghai where jaywalking, traffic violations and skipping train fares can get you blacklisted.

But that’s not all. Citizens who do not visit their elderly parents or do not sort out their garbage into the appropriate recycling bins can also be penalised and effectively frozen out by the state.

Businessman Xie Wen spoke with MarketPlace.org after he was blacklisted following a financial dispute in which he never paid a debt to a client who sued his company.

He was then added to the Chinese Supreme Court’s list of “discredited” people.

Wen said: “It hurt my business. My clients didn’t trust me. I didn’t get much work.”

Read full story here…

 

By | 2018-06-11T09:01:01+00:00 June 11th, 2018|Conspiracy, Featured, Main|2 Comments

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  1. mcolman June 12, 2018 at 12:03 pm

    We ,just like the rest of this world,find fault, on the other countries,just to have our government look as the winner,the shine,that has ,,so to speak, God on our side.It`s all bull-only..So not we the people ,but the war-mongering USA,gov.,are really the stinking pigs,just like the fools we blame.How many are getting cast into hell?

  2. mary June 12, 2018 at 1:30 pm

    For those who haven’t heard. Quoting Bill Maher from last week: “I’m hoping for a crashing economy so we can get rid of Trump. Bring on the recession. Sorry if it hurts people, but it’s either root for a recession or you lose your democracy.” I don’t think this guy is joking. He’s got a twisted sense of humor if he was. I’m sure that many influential and affluent individuals would rather that the world crash and burn than to lose their elitist positions.

    China’s “new” social credit system sounds like the old caste system of India on steroids. Watching for the rest of the world governments to join the bandwagon. Your social credit rating could change like the weather. Can you be reinstated to glory? Will you be reinstated? Sounds like a losing battle to me.

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